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Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> they must ask themselves if they want to be the kind of party david brooks, conservative, describe, a party of fanatics who don't compromise no matter how sweet a deal for their side might be and how great consequences for the nation. >> the senate majority leader was talking about conservative and "new york times" columnist david brooks' column saying that the republican party is no longer a normal party. its members, charles, don't accept the logic of compromise. >> forgive me, but i have to correct your copy again. he is a great columnist, but not a conservative. he is a moderate -- >> moderate conservative. >> no, he is a moderate. >> he is a moderate. he is open to all use. i think what republicans are doing on taxes is correct. if you hear eric cantor or john boehner, we are ready for tax reform, which was done in the mid-1980's, a most successful piece of legislation. you cut out the loopholes and use the money to cut rates. you get a fairness and the rich don't have advantages by having lobbyists create loopholes and exploit them, and you stimulate economic growth because the libera
be the chief executive of the pay tv operations. >> rebecca brooks was left to succeed james murdoch. >> i am convinced that the leadership of the company is the right thing. she is doing the right thing for the company. >> the inescapable point is that rebekah brooks is vulnerable. she is the last person standing. these are times of crisis. his father was hoping that he can make this as his business. >> is joining me now is the political editor of the news of the world, the former express and independents editor. i am joined by rupert murdoch plus -- rupert murdoch's biographer. >> who is to blame. how high that goes is still to be seen. the culture comes from need to make stories, the decision to break the rules. the decision to go that extra 200 miles into illegality. they did not know what was going on and that is inconceivable. >> you were rupert murdoch's biographer. you knew him well and his motivations. is it realistic that he did not have a grip at what was going on. he must have an eye on this. was there an inkling that perhaps he would just let things go. he was a control freak, wa
brooks, the conservative, described, a party that will not compromise the matter how sweet the deal for the site might be and how great consequences for our nation. >> hariri is talking about conservative "new york times - -- have we read it is talking about conservative "new york times" columnist david brooks, wrote that the republican party is no longer a normal party. its members, he says, don't accept the logic of compromise. >> forgive me, i have to correct your copy again. he is a great calmness, but he's not conservative -- great columnist, but he's not conservative. he is moderate. >> moderate conservative. >> no, he is moderate, open to all views. what you are saying, if you hear eric cantor john boehner, we are ready for tax reform, which was done in the mid-1980's. you cut out the loopholes and you use the money to cut rates. you get the fairness. rich don't have advantages by having the lobbyists create loopholes and exploit them. you stimulate economic growth because the loopholes and in and of themselves is starting economically and the low rates encourage economic act
be months before they know how much damage is actually been done. >> brown: and david brooks and ruth marcus analyze the week's news. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> well, the best companies are driven by new ideas. >> our future depends on new ideas. we spend billions on advanced technologies. >> it's all about investing in the future. >> we can find new energy-- more cleaner, safer and smarter. >> collaborating with the best in the field. >> chevron works with the smartest people at leading universities and tech companies. >> and yet, it's really basic. >> it's paying off every day. the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: americans seeking work, and many hoping to hold on to their jobs, found little
manager brooke. [applause] he is working closely with edgar lopez, who manages all of our major projects, but was here pretty much from day one. they are being supported by our city engineers and the rest of the department coming together to deliver a great project to the ratepayers of san francisco. we're so happy to be a part of this. congratulations to the puc on getting to this point, the topping off ceremony. [applause] >> as the owners, we are certainly willing to move in, but we are not building the building. representing the builders is andy of webcor. [applause] >> it is great to be here. most people do not realize this building almost did not happen. i was at a green building conference and i ran into mayor gavin newsom. he said, we are not going to build that building. we cannot afford to. i said, mayor, you cannot afford not to. this building will be an example of what all cities should build. with the energy savings that were mentioned, this building will be like no others. when the city starts to operate, they will say, why did we not do this before? it is a wonderful thing
brooks, in a heated discussion with her staff. talk about irony. we'll have it for you. >>> that these people could have had their phones hacked into in order to generate stories for a newspaper is simply disgusting. i cannot think what was going through the minds of the people who did this, but this scandal is not just about some journalists on one newspaper. it's not even just about the press. it's also about the police, and yes, it's also about how politics works and about politicians too. >> british prime minister david cameron vows to leave no stone unturned in the scandal involving "news of the world" tabloid. murdoch is reportedly flying to london tomorrow. three men were arrested today in connection with the scan doll. andy coulson was detained this morning on conspiracy and corruption allegations. also arrested, formal royal editor, clive goodman, he already spent four months in jail in '07. both coulson and goodman have been released on bail. british police also arrested a 63-year-old male in connection with the phone hacking, but his identity has not been rel
conservative voices like david brooks of "the new york times" are telling republicans it's time to make a deal. brooks wrote this week and it got a lot of attention. if the debt ceiling talks fail, independent voters will see that democrats were willing to compromise but republicans were not. if responsible republicans don't take control, independents will conclude that republican fanaticism caused this default. they will conclude that republicans are not fit to govern and they will be right. got a lot of attention. i asked senator jim demint about it. and he said, well, david brooks doesn't speak for true republicans. that's what he said. >> he doesn't speak for jim demint, that's for sure. he certainly doesn't speak for some of the house freshmen that were elected on the whole idea -- this whole tea party fols fi that they're going to come to washington and shake things up, basically be obstructionists. but david brooks is absolutely right. what weave seen here in washington is kind of a sad note over the past couple of years. we've seen negotiators and compromisers leave. so many senators h
a group of comments from the new york time from washington david brooks, with me here in new york, david leonhardt, roger cohen and tom friedman. they have all won too many awards to talk about. mi pleased to have all of them on this program today to talk about america. what's the challenge for us? because wherever i go around the world the thing they say is tt we want america to take care of their business at home first, so that they can lead the world and pla an important part as the rest of the world changes. >> well, charlie, i think the world does understan that america provides a certain degree ofglobal governance and global goods, public goods that stabilize the world and fuel the global economy. i mean to me we are the tent pole that holds up the world. if we buckle your kids won't just grow up in a different america, they will grow up in a different world. and that is what i think what is playing out here is so important. i think our challengright now is to do four things at once. i think we have to stimulate the economy a little more because clearly we're rolling back, there ar
, charlie sheen is at the bottom of the barrel as you said. he's a pretty easy target. his ex-wife, brooke mueller, she accused him of attacking her on christmas day. he served time for a domestic assault with her. if she make any jokes about her she will sue. i think everyone in charlie sheen's orbit is uncomfortable making jokes about undisturbing, dark situations surrounding him. >> about addiction and all of that, these things are usually pretty raunchy, and i have to say, they're fun, they're not for kids. it's not even nc-17, it's rated x in my opinion. how are they going to get around that? i guess comedians can write around anything. there are issues that he needs to pay attention to and that aren't necessarily funny. >> i imagine that they're just going to go for it, and they're going to let this hang out. charlie's kind of been letting hang out already, doing his violent torpedo of truth tour. people haven't liked that much, it's been hit or miss. whether having other comedians on the stage is going to pull it together. they're doing this on the same night that the new "two and a
was watching brook baldwin out there yesterday. she said she went to space camp growing up. >> of course she did. that's brooke. brooke is one of those adventurous people i know. you're right. it's amazing to see. yeah, we all grew up with this. so many of us did. this is the thing. as incredible and dramatic as the liftoff is. in some respects i have to think many people might agree. landing is even more impressive. i was speaking with the executive producer about this yesterday. when one of these things lands and it goes back into the stratosphere of 17,500 miles per hour, it's like a rock with wings. and when it lands, when it comes in it has one chance because it's not powered. it can't go past the three-mile strip of pavement where it's going to land. it has one opportunity. >> wait a minute. you know glide ratio. did you go to space camp? >> no, i did not. but i wish i had. i feel like i missed out. >> you can still do it. >> got to try. >> thanks. appreciate it. >>> how about this, the new unemployment report is now giving republican presidential candidates even more ammunition agains
to close down operations. yet today, owner rupert murdoch expressed "total support for rebekah brooks," the embattled executive who formerly edited the paper. south sudan became the newest nation trying to become the u.n.'s 193rd member following civil wars that left an estimated 1.5 million dead. holding most of the nation's oil reserve, continued tensions in the former sudan. dignitaries at the ceremonies were colin powell and u.n. envoy susan rice. a federal judge in new york city heard arguments in a lawsuit that challenges search procedures at the u.s. border. at issue the privacy of personal electronic devices and the plaintiff is an american citizen who says he has done nothing wrong. michelle miller has more. >> i've crossed the border dozens of times. >> pascal was on a train from montreal to new york last year when his travel history raised concerns at the u.s. border. >> i lived in jordan. i've traveled to lebanon. and i've also been to yemen. >> border agents searched his belongings, seized his laptop and ordered him to log on. >> next thing i know, my laptop is being peru
-up businesses in the u.s. since they started measuring the trend. no surprise to march kin bailey of brookings. >> they are definitely one of the reasons we're not recovering as quickly as many of us hoped. there has been a drop in new business formation and small businesses are not hiring. even those that are star go are not hiring that many people. >> so what is driving submit experts brad jensen say it's largely about washington's unresolved debt crisis and the lack of certainty about how lawmakers will address issues regarding the solvency of medicare and medicaid and social security? >> there is enormous uncertainty with how the political process is going to grapple with these issues. >> a senior research fellow at george mason university says the unresolved matters is fueling a level of instability that tends to bring small businesses to a standstill. >> it paralyzes entrepreneurs and people who are willing to actually take risks and invest our money in our business but also invest this n workers and hire people. >> while pundits and lawmakers and economists may disagree how to resolve t
that he had bribed police. so far, rebecca brooks, a former editor turned senior executive, hasn't been investigated, even though she told a parliamentary committee that... >> we have paid the police for information in the past. >> reporter: now public opinion has turned sharply against the paper's owner, rupert murdoch, one of the world's most powerful media tycoons. he bought "the news of the world" back in 1969 and made it the cornerstone of an empire that now includes fox news and the "wall street journal." simon hoggart is a columnist for "the guardian." his newspaper has been investigating the scandal for years, and he says murdoch is facing an enormous backlash. >> it was fear of murdoch before a few days ago, now it's just unalloyed loathing for the guy. >> reporter: the murdochs moved fast to close down "the news of the world" this week, but it's much easier to stop the presses than to repair a reputation tainted by lying and deceit. authorities announced a short time ago that they now arrested a third person in this scandal, a 63-year-old man, although we don't know yet who he
of the world," is rebecca brooks, now murdoch's editor in britain. she still has her job, despite calls for a dismissal. she said the paper had to be killed quickly. >> eventually, it will come out, why things went wrong and who was responsible. and that will be -- that will be another very, very difficult moment in this company's history. >>>>eporter: with a comment like that, it is clear the scandal will not be dying with the paper. it's fair to say there's a lot of reporters, managers, politicians and police, wondering if and when they will be facing criminal charges. david? >> jeffrey kofman in london. jeffrey, thank you. >>> while the closing of that british newspaper is the headline dominating the news in london, it's a part of britain making headlines here. the future king and queen are in this country. british royalty meeting hollywood royalty tonight. prince william and kate are in southern california. and bob woodruff is with them in santa barbara this evening. bob, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, david. yeah. the game has just begun. this is a beautiful spot right he
. but there was suspicion that rebekah brooks must have sanctioned the hacking something she always denied. she's a close friend with prime minister david cameron, an awkward fact. but he said this. >> what this government is doing is making sure that the fact the public and i feel so appalled by what's happened. murder victims, terrorist victims who had their phones hacked is quite disgraceful. >> reporter: one thing that went spla spectacularly wrong for the prime minister was to hire this man. he may now be facing criminal charges. for rupert murdoch, the decision to close "news of the world" doesn't mean the scandal is over. there's a police investigation to be faced. on one sunday one thing will end, the "news of the world" printing presses will stop for the very last time. dan rivers, cnn, london. >> the phone hack being of crime victims has rocked a media empire but it all started with celebrities. we'll hear from an angry actor, hugh grant. airlines are warned of the next big threat. terrorists with bombs surgically implanted in their bodies. >>> actor hugh grant was among those targeted by. >> e
coulter, michael moore, david brooks. thanks for being with us, here's more booktv. >> are new but, the best of battles and leaders of the civil war. abraham lincoln was, as he told the council of generals that he convened at the white house, greatly disturbed by the state of affairs. the treasury was nearly exhausted. public credit was operating. congress was full of jack depends, as he said. foreign relations were perilous. spending more time fighting each other than the confederates in missouri and these. the general was sick in bed with typhoid fever, incommunicado. the army still make is inspiring his famous comment. if general mcclellan did not want to use the army may be can bar for a while. if something was not done send he confided the bottom would be out of the whole affair. 1862 may have been in no way the most dizzying year of the war. before it was over the in that better than worse than better than worse. within its roller-coaster of triumph and disaster abraham lincoln did nothing less then transformed the war for union into a war for union freedom. that was a pretty
that he may be trying to protect some of his top execs, like rebecca brooks. she was the editor of "news of the world" during these crucial years when the phone hacking took place. and i think this was a form of damage control, a desperate move to be sure by murdock to say, the paper is so tarnished and is the focus of so much outrage in britain over the targeting of terror victims, not just celebrities, why not get rid of it? and murdock is trying very hard to salvage a major media deal he wants to do in britain. it's a $12 billion deal and he wants to make this scandal just go away. >> howard kurtz will be talking again about the scandal in much more greater depth on reliable sources tomorrow, sunday 11:00 a.m. eastern. >>> keeping up with the royal couple on their whirlwind three-day visit to the west coast, california well, it's not going to be easy. prince william and catherine went straight from the airport to a technology conference in beverly hills. in a few hours west coast time, the prince will play polo in santa barbara and then tonight the couple will rub elbows with the holl
wonder, has there been anything said about the former editor, one of the top executives, rebecca brooks, and whether she should be worried at all that investigators will be coming her way? >> well, i would imagine she is extremely worried. though she has maintained throughout that she knew nothing about any of these illegal practices when she was editing the newspaper between 2000 and 2003. she has been elevated since then to chief executive of the parent company but there have been calls from all sides, really, here that she should step down, she should take responsibility for what went on her watch. she has maintained she knew nothing about it. for the moment, she remains in post. rurp ert measu rupert murdoch, her ultimate boss, is on his way to the uk amid this growing crisis around this newspaper. meanwhile, the 260 staff just finishing up this last edition in the building behind me, they're all out of a job. some of them spoke earlier today, i think we have a sound bite of some of the staff that came out. have a listen. >> emotional, but every single one of us working up there sta
adviser. >> dan, is it true that the top executive, rebecca brooks, spoke to staff yesterday? if so, what did she say to them? >> reporter: it is true, yeah. i mean, she was sort of in a recording that was smuggled out of the building, sort of rallying the troops, really. but she has refused to step down herself, even though there have been calls from almost every conceivable angle for her to go. she is chief executive of the parent company, news international, but she was editor of the paper at the time that some of the worst examples of this hacking went on, for example, hacking into murdered 13-year-old schoolgirls' cell phone to get stories. now, she has maintained all the way through that she knew nothing about this. she put out statements saying, you know, that it's despicable and so on. she knew nothing about what was going on, but many find that a little bit, to put it mildly, unbelievable, that she could have story after story on her front page without at some point asking where those stories were coming from. >> all right, rupert murdoch on his way there. i'm sure we'll find out
, a woman called rebecca brooks and number of celebrities and public relations people. there is a very unusual and tight bond between members of the political establishment in the united kingdom and members of the media establishment that have gone on for some years now. it's been developing through different situations but it's laboring and conservative. but, it has become intense. that also ruptured this week. host: events involving the publication "news of the world" set to close tomorrow. our topic for this segment. if you want to ask our guest questions, 202-624-111. tweets, you can send to us off of c-span wj. have there been form charges, with everything you've talked about, have there been form charges filed? guest: not against andy coulson. we have had the former royal reporter of "news of the world" has previously been jailed. and was rearrested yesterday. but we do need to treat some of this with care. there are two separate police investigations going on now the london arm of rupert murdoch media group is now fully cooperating with, they say. and has been since january this
'm brooke anderson. >> "the insider" is on. >> how did you survive? >> there's a switch that i had to shut off. >> jaycee on going into labor in captivity. >> you just do what you have to do to survive. why cops couldn't crack the kidnapping case. >> 60 times they came to the house. she was there the whole time. >> and i would cry every day. >> then, nancy, what is going to happen when casey is freed next week? >> tot mom will probably have a million dollar book deal. >> nancy grace after casey's release date is changed and outrage over these images of her buying be
okay brook elementary school. the delivery driver told police had had just delivered a pizza when he was confronted by five suspects who stole his car. two of the suspects crashed the vehicle and fled on foot. one person was caught. police say a neighbor then reported a teenager trying to break into a vacant rental home. police say he tried to set the home on fire by putting a cutting board on a stove burner. officers put the small fire out and found the teenager in some nearby bushes. >>> we are now learning that one of the men shot in oakland thursday night has died. the shooting happened on 71st. the name of the victim was not released, part of a string of three shootings that left five other people injured. police are still trying to determine if they are connected. >>> oakland firefighters say a grass fire in the oakland hills was caused by a car that overheated. the fire started just after 3:30 yesterday afternoon, in a car on skyline boulevard about a half mile from the space and science center. crews put the fire out a hour later and only one acre was burned. officials say th
. on the case of rebecca brooks, i don't think it is right for the prime minister to start picking and choosing who should run and who should not run media organizations. it has been reported that she offered her resignation over this. before i take your questions, let me say this. for people watching this scandal unfolded, there is something disturbing about what they see. just think about who they put their trust in. the politicians that represent them, and all of them -- a political system that people think is on their side and a press that is yet free and vigorous and holds those in power to drive them completely mad. we need a free press that is all so clean and trustworthy. that is what people want, that is not what i want. -- and that is what i want. >> we have asked him many times about your decision to appoint an be as your main communications man. you said that he resigned and paid the price. given that hundreds of people lost their jobs yesterday, given that the editor said that he warned you of what they might have had and you would have known what would have happened under his watc
for it. on the case of rebecca brooks, i don't think it is right for the prime minister to start picking and choosing who should run and who should not run media organizations. it has been reported that she offered her resignation over this. in this situation, i would have taken it. before i take your questions, let me say this. for people watching this scandal unfolded, there is something disturbing about what they see. just think about who they put their trust in. the police to protect them. the politicians that represent them, and all of them -- a political system that people think is on their side and a press that is yet free and vigorous and holds those in power to drive them completely mad. we need a free press that is all so clean and trustworthy. that is what people want, that is not what i want. -- and that is what i want. and i will not rest until we get it. thank you for listening. i'm very happy to take some questions. >> we have asked him many times -- you many times about your decision to appoint an be as your main communications man. you said that he resigned and paid the
, we have probably 42 solds and marines from walter reed army hospital and brook army medical center and some have been wounded as recently as seven or eight weeks ago and the idea is is get them out moving again. >> most of the goes here today have lost limbs in combat, and, so, you have come up with ways they can get out here and still do some of the things they used to do. >>guest: not only do they do things they used to do but some have never been waterskiing before, or never been kayaking and they get a chance to do that. rick: this is a community that was especially touched on 9/11. >>guest: this community got hit hard. a lost first spondees from this community, policemen and firemen, and a month later, everyone knows there was the horrible plane crash in the more bore and this community has never forgotten from the beginning, they have been standing up and supporting the warriors. rick: what kind of support do you need from the community and from our viewers? >>guest: wealth we say that it take as village. it takes the community, really, to assist in reintegration. the governm
journal" and "newsweek." is also a senior fellow at the brookings institute, and was previously a supreme court correspondent for "the new york times." he graduated from harvard law school, but despite that handicap has done quite well for himself, including his outstanding book on the shameful injustice of the duke law cross case, which she co-wrote with professor casey johnson. insight from that book might be relevant today regarding the failed criminal charges for dominique strauss-kahn, where casey antony, but hopefully today we will urge him to stick to the supreme court's term. with that, let me welcome jess bravin to begin our program. [applause] >> thank you, todd gaziano. well, as scribes, our job is to make the supreme court interesting, and it was a year where i think that michael, stuart, and die, it is came closer to earning -- and i, at least came closer to earning our pay. it began with the chance for something new and exciting coming out of this old building on first street, but it turned out to be business as usual, which many of the major cases being offered instead of r
Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)